US

Raising our sights in Syria

President Obama’s announcement on Saturday that he stands ready – before UN weapons inspectors report on their findings but contingent on Congressional consultation – to initiate military action against the Syrian regime for its alleged use of chemical weapons in Damascus two weeks ago, has received mixed reactions both in the US and further afield.

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Summary of roundtable discussion on “NATO’s future nuclear posture”

This paper highlights the main themes arising from a roundtable discussion held on July 25th, 2013 in Washington, D.C., which brought a small group of experts together with representatives from a number of NATO member states to discuss the future of NATO’s nuclear posture and engagement with Russia on arms control and nuclear weapons. This discussion built on workshops previously held in Moscow and Brussels in 2012 and 2013.

Time for Action in Iran

U.S. President Barack Obama pledged to change a great number of things in his first election campaign 2008, and among them was bringing peace to the Middle East. Long neglected during his first Presidential term, it seems that now, at last, Israeli-Palestinian relations may be rising to a higher level of political salience.

BASIC 2012 Annual Activities Report

A Summary of BASIC's activities for Advisors, Patrons, Donors, and Partners

Throughout 2012, large scale endeavors at international and regional levels examined ways to advance international security and reduce threats of nuclear proliferation: in South Korea, heads of state meet at the second Nuclear Security Summit in March; the 2015 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty review process commenced with a Preparatory Committee meeting in Vienna in April; the NATO Alliance delivered a new Deterrence and Defense Posture Review in May; and throughout the year, regional actors in the Middle East and beyond endeavored to meet in Helsinki to establish a WMD-free zone.

Countdown to Chaos?: Timelines and Implications of Procurement Decisions for NATO's Dual-Capable Aircraft

NATO Flags

NATO's nuclear sharing program is in trouble. The United States has continuously maintained nuclear weapons in Europe since March 1954 (and NATO has agreed to this policy since December of that year). Since 1991, the only U.S. nuclear weapons in NATO’s arsenal have been B61 gravity bombs, designed for delivery to target by “dual-capable” fighter-bomber aircraft (DCA). These aircraft are rapidly reaching the end of their normal service lives, however, and are the only means by which NATO shares the threat of nuclear attack on potential opponents in times of crisis among several Allied nations.

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