uk trident

All Party Parliamentary Group on Global Security and Non-proliferation

BASIC collaborates closely with the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Global Security and Non-Proliferation. The purpose of the APPG is to encourage discussion and debate, on the basis of expert information and opinion from across the political spectrum, on matters relating to global security and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction – whether nuclear, chemical or biological. Its clerk, Lorna Richardson, is formally a BASIC employee but is seconded wholly to work with the APPG.




A Memo to the Next Prime Minister: Options Surrounding the Replacement of Trident

The Main Gate decision on the construction of a new fleet of nuclear ballistic missile submarines at a capital cost of £20-25bn is expected early 2016. This Memo to the Prime Minster clarifies that there will in fact be a range of options available when a decision is to be made including the commissioning of four, three or two Successor submarines, further delay in the programme or a decision to begin the process of divesting the UK of its nuclear arsenal.

BASIC response to 'Retiring Trident'

Today Centre Forum published the report ‘Retiring Trident: An alternative proposal for UK nuclear deterrence’ by Toby Fenwick. This report is an important and timely contribution to the debate on options facing an incoming government. BASIC does not endorse this option specifically, though the paper is well argued and an excellent response to those who assert that like-for-like replacement of Trident is the only credible nuclear weapons option for the United Kingdom.

Launch of the Trident Commission’s concluding report

Trident Commission launch

BASIC set up the Trident Commission in 2011 as an inquiry into Britain’s nuclear weapon policy. Its final report, published today, represents the collective views of the eight Commission members after engaging in an intense three-year process. The primary purpose of this report is to contribute to an informed and deeper debate on Trident renewal that focuses on national security in its widest sense. We are experiencing rapid strategic change in this century and the relevance of our major defence investments to tomorrow’s threats must be analysed across a wide range of considerations.

The Scottish referendum: a chance to challenge our nuclear assumptions?

With just under six months to go until the referendum on Scottish independence, there is still little clarity about how any independence agreement would shape up in practice.  A myriad of issues remains on the table, ranging from the everyday - Will there be border control? How will the postal system function? Which television stations will be available? - right up to the most complex strategic questions over currency and economic independence, membership of international organisations, and the future of the UK and Scotland’s defense policies.

Subscribe to RSS - uk trident