uranium

Iran update: number 127

Summary

  • Russia decides not to sell Iran its S-300 anti-aircraft system
  • In the second presidential debate, Obama and McCain sound off on sanctions
  • The Bush Administration holds off on establishing permanent diplomatic presence in Iran
  • Iran refutes earlier hints that it might cease uranium enrichment on condition that it receives a guaranteed international supply of nuclear fuel
  • Iran withdraws its bid to be on the board of the IAEA in favor of regional partner Syria

 

Free terms: 

Newsletter: 

Region: 

Topic: 

You see, Richard, we all have to make compromises...

And now let us return to the days of yore, February 11, 2004, when President Bush, made remarks on Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation.


President Bush actually said (no, really, I’m not kidding) some good things about how to prevent proliferation.


But, in light of what I’ve previously posted about Richard Barlow, I’m thinking that perhaps the US government might want to rethink how much it appreciates the efforts of the men and women of our intelligence community:

Germany: Keeping the tradition

You have to hand it to Germany: at least it is consistent. During Dr Khan’s day, some of his best suppliers were Germany companies. Firms like Leybold Heraeus helped with a uranium hexafluoride handling plant as well as other items. And a Leybold employee, Gotthard Lerch (who was on trial earlier this year, which I’ll post on in the future), remained in touch with the doctor long after he left Leybold to set up his own company.

Khan and the Butter Factory

On May 6 2007, The Washington Times published an article by editor at large Arnaud de Borchgrave, talking about the common link between North Korea, Iran, and Libya. That would be Dr Khan's network, of course. Or as JRR Tolkien memorably put it in the Lord of the Rings, One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.

A front company by any other name is still a front company

On June 13 the Washington Times ran an article asserting that Iran is using newly created front companies in a bid to frustrate US and United Nations sanctions on its suspect nuclear programs. The charges were made by the Paris-based National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), which supports the overthrow of the regime in Tehran.

The Iranian nuclear crisis: a risk assessment

Sir John Thomson argues that the Western approach to Tehran, currently led by the Bush Administration, is unlikely to halt Iran's uranium enrichment program, and may even contribute to the worst case scenarios: a war with Iran and an Iranian nuclear weapon. He concludes by surveying three options for the nuclear program: "mothballing," "pilot plant," and "multilateral enrichment facility."

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - uranium