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Iran update: number 125

Summary

  • Russia commits to completing light water reactor at Bushehr; overall Russian-Iranian nuclear ties may be increasing
  • Iran risking new round of sanctions, but no news yet
  • French President Sarkozy takes up mantle as a principal intermediary between West and Iran
  • Syrian attempts to persuade Iran to more seriously commit to inspection regime
  • Iranian air force to hold war games during Ramadan

On September 2, the state-run Russian nuclear consortium, AtomStroiExport (ASE),

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Bilateral nuclear disarmament strategies after the Ossetian conflict: A personal perspective

One of my second or third reactions to the news last Friday was shock over the impact on our agenda that depends so heavily upon establishing a positive relationship between the US and Russia. I have been avoiding being pessimistic in public because that doesn't help anyone, but it really doesn't look good. From my perspective, though, while the Russian response on Friday was undoubtedly disproportionate, it would be wrong to characterize this as Russia displaying a disinterest in negotiations with the United States and instead challenging democracy head-on.

Iran update: number 122

Summary

  • Possibility of the United States opening an interests section in Iran
  • Latest round of P5+1-Iran talks produces few results, despite US presence
  • Iran and the United States continue military exercises and aggressive posturing
  • Skepticism regarding Iranian claims of missile testing success
  • Russia may try Uzbek man for attempting to smuggle WMD components to Iran

There have been some notable changes in the Bush administration's approach towards Iran since the release of BASIC's last Iran Update.

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India-US Nuclear Cooperation Deal: It's baaaaack…

The supposedly dead US-India Nuclear Cooperation Deal resurrected itself during the first week of July. It had seemed all but certain that the deal would die in the Indian Parliament, due to the Communist Party's resistance to the agreement. However, Prime Minister Singh changed his strategy and instead courted the Samajwadi Party to support the deal, thus keeping his majority - and allowing the agreement to pass the Indian Parliament.

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