NATO

Trump's Nuclear Rhetoric and its implications for European Security: 27 Feb 2017

Trump’s Nuclear Rhetoric and its implications for European Security

Further questions were raised over the direction of US nuclear posture review last week. In an exclusive interview with Reuters, Trump opined that the US has 'fallen behind on nuclear weapon capacity' and pledged the US to be 'top of the pack' when it comes to nuclear weapons.

NATO Military Buildup Aimed at 'Ensuring Reasons' of Alliance's Existence

NATO countries recently finalized arrangements to boost the alliance's rotational presence in Eastern Europe with four battalions in 2017. In an interview with Sputnik, Paul Ingram, Executive Director of the British American Security Information Council, commented on the issue.

"There is no doubt that it [the summit] is aimed at Russia. But it is also aimed at attempting to draw in and ensure that the alliance is cohesive," the Paul Ingram said. 

Tactical Nuclear Weapons, NATO and Deterrence

Nuclear sharing arrangements and the active deployment of US theatre nuclear weapons (TNW) in Europe under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) are viewed as critical components of its deterrence posture. Previously, this nuclear posture was aimed at the former Soviet Union (USSR) and Warsaw Pact alliance during the Cold War. Since the end of the Cold War and the absorption of former Warsaw Pact states into NATOthe official justification for those systems remaining is not connected to any specified enemy.

United States and NATO

As part of its military doctrine, NATO relies on nuclear deterrence based upon the strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and the United Kingdom. There are also U.S. B61 tactical gravity bombs based in five other member states as part of NATO’s nuclear sharing arrangements. Leaders and constituencies from NATO member states hold different views on how much emphasis the Alliance should place on the nuclear component of its military doctrine, and what the composition of the nuclear forces should look like.

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New Cold War

We tend to see new events as a continuation of past ones. The first automobiles were called “horseless carriages”. So the worsening of relations between Western Europe and Russia is called a “new Cold War”

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