nuclear posture

Anita Friedt at the BASIC Shadow NATO Summit

Anita Friedt, Director of the Office of Policy and Regional Affairs in the U.S. State Department speaks about the NATO Deterrence and Defense Poture Review a week before the Chicago Summit at the Shadow NATO Summit hosted by BASIC, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, the Elliott School of International Affairs, NATO Watch, and Strategy International in Washington, DC on May 14 and 15, 2012.

 

Norway's Approach to NATO's Deterrence and Defence Posture Review

NATO is currently debating its nuclear posture as part of the Deterrence and Defence Posture Review, for discussion at the May 2012 Chicago summit. This could have an important bearing on the future direction for NATO – an Alliance bent on maintaining superior and comprehensive capabilities, or one that plays a proactive role in multilateral disarmament.

Strategic Dialogue on Nuclear Posture

The British American Security Information Council held its second strategic dialogue at the Capitol Hill Club in Washington, DC on September 18, 2012. Drs. Janne Nolan and Christopher Ford engaged in a dialogue on nuclear posture and accepted questions from the crowd. Introductions were done by Peter Huessy and Paul Ingram. Click on the video below to listen to the event.

GAO reveals challenges ahead for U.S. commitments to NATO's nuclear deployments

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has warned that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DOD) could be in danger of failing to meet B61 Life Extension Program (LEP) goals and leave the United States unable to support its tactical nuclear deployments that are assigned to NATO.

The United States, NATO’s Strategic Concept, and Nuclear Issues

Washington appeared satisfied with the November 2010 Lisbon Summit outcome and new Strategic Concept regarding nuclear weapons and arms control. In this article, Amb. Steven Pifer analyzes the dual tracks of the Deterrence and Defense Posture Review process and development of a U.S. approach to nonstrategic nuclear weapons for possible future negotiations with Russia.

What's next with Trident in the United States?

The United States and the United Kingdom have collaborated very closely for many decades on their submarine-based nuclear weapons systems, and developments in one country are likely to continue having an impact on the other. This brief reviews the United States' strategic nuclear submarine program within the context of U.S. and U.K. plans for replacing the fleets.

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