arms control

US and the INF Treaty: Testing NATO: 3rd April 2017

The US response to Russia’s supposed violation of the INF Treaty is a litmus test for the Trump administration’s approach to arms controls and strategic stability. It will give a clear indication of the Administration’s attitude towards relations with Russia, its NATO allies and to arms control more generally.

Tactical Nuclear Weapons, NATO and Deterrence

Nuclear sharing arrangements and the active deployment of US theatre nuclear weapons (TNW) in Europe under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) are viewed as critical components of its deterrence posture. Previously, this nuclear posture was aimed at the former Soviet Union (USSR) and Warsaw Pact alliance during the Cold War. Since the end of the Cold War and the absorption of former Warsaw Pact states into NATOthe official justification for those systems remaining is not connected to any specified enemy.

Non-proliferation and Disarmament in the Middle East

Working with partners across the Middle East, BASIC has been developing a draft treaty on a WMD Free Zone in the Middle East, that forms the basis of a process of constructive international dialogue. This includes a series of workshops held throughout Europe and the Middle East, an invitation to experts to explore the means to improve engagement, and to establish an institution that will bring together analysts and practitioners to discuss issues of implementation and verification.

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Arms Control, Non-Proliferation & Disarmament Diplomacy

BASIC has followed developments around nuclear arms control, non-proliferation and disarmament treaties for almost thirty years. This page includes links to issue areas for recent coverage, factsheets and other resources for key treaties, initiatives and dialogues that BASIC has focused on as key steps in achieving progress towards our vision.

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What comes next for U.S. nuclear weapons policy?

Brandenburg Gate

This Wednesday, President Obama is slated to give his next big foreign policy speech at the historically significant Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. It was at this Gate – an enduring symbol of both the division and subsequent unity of East and West Berlin – that Ronald Reagan urged then-General Secretary of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, to “tear down this wall” in 1987, and President Clinton spoke of a free and unified Berlin in 1994, following the end of the Cold War.

NATO’s Nuclear Guardians: Why NATO’s bureaucracy is unable to initiate change to, or support reform of, Alliance nuclear policy

BASIC senior consultant Ted Seay explores the institutional history of NATO’s theater nuclear weapons (TNW) and explains why in recent years the Alliance has been slow to move forward with changes that could further reduce this arsenal.

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