missiles

Iran Update: Number 149

  • Latest IAEA assessment of Iran’s nuclear program echoes recent Agency reports
  • The impact of Stuxnet
  • International divide over sanctions grows
  • Speculation on Iran’s intentions and capabilities
  • Iranian rocketry, missile developments
  • Middle East protests: context and meaning for Iranian leadership and U.S. influence

Free terms: 

Newsletter: 

Region: 

Topic: 

Iran Update: Number 148

Getting to Zero Update

Iran Update: Number 147

Getting to Zero Update

The Obama Administration was hoping for the U.S. Senate to ratify the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) now that the U.S. mid-term elections are over. If the treaty is not brought to the floor before the end of the year, then prospects for the treaty dim in a Senate where more members will be reluctant to hand the President a foreign policy achievement, and votes in favor of the treaty will be more difficult to muster.

Free terms: 

Newsletter: 

Region: 

Topic: 

Getting to Zero Update

The debate over Trident was heating up with questions about how the United Kingdom will cover costs during a time of tightening defense budgets. In the United States, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee sent the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty to the full Senate, but doubts remained as to whether the Senate would approve the treaty before the end of the year. Thirty-six members of the European Leaders Network called on NATO to increase its role in nuclear arms control just as the Alliance was circulating a draft of its new Strategic Concept, which was last revised in 1999.

Free terms: 

Newsletter: 

Region: 

Topic: 

A Progressive Nuclear Policy: Rethinking Continuous-at-sea deterrence

The United Kingdom has maintained unbroken nuclear weapons patrols since 1968. The rationale for this doctrine of continuous deterrence has been based on several pillars that are irrelevant in today’s environment. Rather than an absolute need for continuous deterrent, there is instead a great opportunity for Britain to take the lead as the most progressive of the nuclear weapons states by reducing the readiness and size of its
strategic force. Article originally published in RUSI Journal, Vol. 155, No. 2.

Please select the PDF icon below to read the full article. 

Time to reassess Trident options amid funding crisis: BASIC report

 

It is time to reassess options for the replacement of the Trident nuclear missile submarines in the light of indications that the capital cost of doing so could run to 28 billion pounds over the next 10-15 years, according to a new report by the British American Security Information Council (BASIC).

Image: 

About BASIC: 

No

Free terms: 

Newsletter: 

Region: 

Topic: 

A crisis in financing Britain’s replacement of Trident?

It is time to reassess options for the replacement of the Trident nuclear missile submarines in the light of indications that the capital cost, to be funded from the Defence Ministry's core budget, could run to 28 billion pounds over the next 10-15 years. But Paul Ingram and Nick Ritchie also argue that it would be a mistake to base a decision on cost alone.

Click the "Full article (PDF)" button below to read the report.

 

Related publication:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - missiles